Term of the day: toft

Travel obligations and internet issues are going to be interfering with daily posts for at least some of the next 10 days to two weeks. So nobody will go into withdrawal, however, The Legal Genealogist offers…

The term of the day:

TOFT.

It definitely isn’t an acronym for “take one for the team” — at least not in old British documents.

In the past, you’d see it referring to a “place or piece of ground on which a house formerly stood, which has been destroyed by accident or decay.”1

Its meaning today is a little broader: “a site for a dwelling and its outbuildings; also : an entire holding comprising a homestead and additional land.”2

toft


SOURCES

  1. Henry Campbell Black, A Dictionary of Law (St. Paul, Minn. : West, 1891), 1176, “toft.”
  2. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (http://www.m-w.com : accessed 16 Oct 2013), “toft.”
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